THE HARVEY WALLBANGER

“Do you like Harvey Wallbangers?”

“Harvey who?”

“Wallbangers, a friend of mine. I’ll introduce you later”

Remember the surreal conversation between Gene Wilder (the blind guy) and Richard Prion (the deaf guy) in “See no evil, hear no evil”?

Remember the Harvey Wallbanger? It was one of hippest drinks of the 70s. The cocktail was sickly sweet and popular, and even had a fun name.


The roots

The Harvey Wallbanger is a mixed drink made with vodka, Galliano (the Italian anise liqueur) and orange juice, so it’s essentially a Screwdriver with Galliano.

It’s rarely ordered now, and most people would be hard-pressed to remember the ingredients.

Reportedly born in the 50s, the cocktail was a hit in the 1970s.

The 70’s may not have been the cocktail’s glory days, but the Harvey Wallbanger has one of the most memorable names in cocktail history—and one of the worst reputations.

Orange juice is delicious at breakfast, but always a little weird when it comes to mixing cocktails; it doesn’t play nice with other ingredients and often throws a drink out of balance.

Its origins, like the drink, are not exactly clear.

According to legend, the Harvey Wallbanger was invented in 1952 by the largely forgotten bartender Donato “Duke” Antone. It was created in honor of a champion surfer, Tom Harvey. After a day of carving up the waves, Harvey would journey to Antone’s bar where he would get drunk and find himself banging into walls trying to find his way out the door. The problem with all of this is that there is little evidence to support the story and there appears to be no information on surfer Tom Harvey…. But either way, we’ve got his drink…


Harvey 5The makin’s
1 1/2 parts vodka
4 parts orange juice
1/2 part Galliano
Orange slice & maraschino cherry for garnish

The drill
Pour the vodka and orange juice into a Collins glass filled with ice cubes
Float Galliano on top by pouring gently over the back of a spoon
Garnish with the orange slice and maraschino cherry

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